THE NATIONAL QUALITY STANDARDS

Early Start Programs are aligned with the guiding principles of the National Quality Framework. These principles are:

The rights and best interests of the child are paramount

Children are successful, competent and capable learners

Equity, inclusion and diversity underpin the framework

Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures are valued

The role of parents and families is respected and supported

Best practice is expected in the provision of education and care services.

QUALITY AREAS, STANDARDS AND ELEMENTS

SPORT/FITNESS

Being Belonging Becoming:

Identity 1.1 – Children feel safe, secure and supported

Community 2.3 – Children become aware of fairness

Wellbeing 3.2 – Children take increasing responsibility for their own health and physical wellbeing.

Learning 4.1 – Children develop dispositions of learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity.

Communication 5.1 – Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes.

National Quality Framework:

Standard 2.1 – Element 2.1.3       Healthy eating and physical activity are promoted and appropriate for each a child

“24 hours movement guidelines Australian- The Early Years birth -5 Years”

Being physically active several times a day in a variety of ways, particularly through supervised interactive floor-based play. For those not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes of tummy time. Contributes to toddlers (1-3 years) and pre-schoolers (3-5 years) Physical activity: At least 3 hours spent in a variety of physical activities, of which at least 60 minutes is energetic play, spread throughout the day.

Link to Theory

Frost states that “children learn to control their behaviour within limits and to develop specific skills” through the playing of games or sports with rules – this is supported by the teaching of sports and fitness to the children.

 

YOGA

Being Belonging Becoming:

Identity 1.4 – Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy & respect

Community 2.1 – Children develop sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Wellbeing 3.1 – Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing.

Learning 4.1 – Children develop dispositions of learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity.

Communication 5.1 – Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes.

National Quality Framework:

Standard 2.1 – Element 2.1.3       Healthy eating and physical activity are promoted and appropriate for each a child

“24 hours movement guidelines Australian- The Early Years birth -5 Years”

Being physically active several times a day in a variety of ways, particularly through supervised interactive floor-based play. For those not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes of tummy time. Contributes to toddlers (1-3 years) and pre-schoolers (3-5 years) Physical activity: At least 3 hours spent in a variety of physical activities, of which at least 60 minutes is energetic play, spread throughout the day.

Link to Theory

Rousseau’s philosophy of education is not concerned with the imparting of information and concepts but rather on developing the child’s character and moral sense, so that they may learn to practice self-mastery and remain virtuous – this philosophy aligns with the principles of yoga teaching.

MUSIC & MOVEMENT

Being Belonging Becoming:

Identity 1.2 – Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency

Community 2.1 – Children develop sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Wellbeing 3.1 – Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing.

Learning 4.1 – Children develop dispositions of learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity.

Communication 5.1 – Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes.

National Quality Framework:

Standard 4.1 – Element 4.1.1       The organisation of educators across the service support Children’s learning and development.

Standard 5.1 – Element 5.1.1       Responsive and meaningful interactions build trusting relationships which engage and support each child to feel secure, confident and included.

Link to Theory

Froebel’s philosophy of education was based on four major principles: free self-expression, creativity, social participation and motor expression.  Through music and movement, the children are able to experience the four major principles of Froebel’s philosophy.

 

LANGUAGE

Being Belonging Becoming:

Identity 1.1 – Children feel safe, secure and supported

Community 2.1 – Children develop sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Wellbeing 3.1 – Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing.

Learning 4.3 – Children transfer and adapt what they have learnt from one context to another.

Communication 5.1 – Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes.

National Quality Framework:

Standard 4.1 – Element 4.1.1       The organisation of educators across the service support Children’s learning and development.

Standard 5.1 – Element 5.1.1       Responsive and meaningful interactions build trusting relationships which engage and support each child to feel secure, confident and included.

Link to Theory

Vygotsky emphasised the importance of relationships and interactions between children and more knowledgeable peers and adults.  He believed that children’s cognitive understandings were enriched and deepened through scaffolding.  Vygotsky focused on the notion that children internalise feeling, emotions and ideas and language is the key factor to the development of concepts.  Through learning a foreign language, children are supported in the development of these concepts.

THE EARLY YEARS LEARNING FRAMEWORK

The Early Years Learning Framework guides educators in developing quality programs for children in the early years. Early Start Programs, in conjunction with our partners, aims to enhance the great work being done by educators to support children to achieve the five learning outcomes:

  • Children have a strong sense of identity
  • Children are connected with and contribute to their world
  • Children have a strong sense of wellbeing
  • Children are confident and involved learners
  • Children are effective communicators.

Our team use a play-based approach which aligns with the principles and practices outlined in the framework. In particular:

Principles

  • Secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships
  • Partnerships with families
  • High expectations and equity
  • Respect for diversity
  • Ongoing learning and reflective practice

Practices

  • Holistic approaches
  • Responsiveness to children
  • Learning through play
  • Intentional teaching
  • Learning environments
  • Continuity of learning and transitions

PROVIDING SAFE ENVIRONMENTS FOR CHILDREN

Early Start Programs has a documented Child and Youth Risk Management Strategy to reinforce our commitment to providing safe environments to children. All teachers, coordinators and managers are required to have the relevant working with children check for each jurisdiction.

Children benefit greatly from the Early Start Programs – extracurricular activities provide unique learning experiences for children to develop new skills during their early years.

As our programs are aligned with the National Quality Standards and the Early Years Learning Framework, while children are involved in these great activities, your centre also benefits from offering our programs.

Early Start Programs support services in achieving great results under the National Quality Standards and standing out from their competition.

Services that have introduced Early Start Programs have found strong jumps in occupancy and word-of-mouth referrals.“This is FANTASTIC for a selling point when doing centre tours. Our families are talking with their friends about the added benefits of using our service, a big contributing factor is the Early Start Programs,” says one of our Melbourne partner centres’ director.